Gene + virus + injury = disease?

One of the most detailed studies to date of how the interaction between genes and environment results in disease has demonstrated that an inflammatory bowel disease resembling human Crohn's needs a specific mutation, virus, and injury to develop in mice.Cross section of colon tissue from apatient with Crohn's diseaseImage:Nephron via Wikimedia Commons "Environmental genomic issues are tough to crack," said linkurl:John Mordes,;http://www.umassmed.edu/igp/faculty/mordes.cfm professor of endocrin

Cristina Luiggi
Jun 23, 2010
One of the most detailed studies to date of how the interaction between genes and environment results in disease has demonstrated that an inflammatory bowel disease resembling human Crohn's needs a specific mutation, virus, and injury to develop in mice.
Cross section of colon tissue from a
patient with Crohn's disease

Image:Nephron via Wikimedia Commons
"Environmental genomic issues are tough to crack," said linkurl:John Mordes,;http://www.umassmed.edu/igp/faculty/mordes.cfm professor of endocrinology at the University of Massachusetts, who has previously characterized a gene-virus interaction in type1 diabetes. "This is a significant contribution to the evolving understanding of how the environment interacts with genomic predisposition." The team, led by immunologist linkurl:Thaddeus Stappenbeck;http://ddrcc.wustl.edu/FACULTY/Stappenbeck.html and virologist linkurl:Herbert Virgin;http://dbbs.wustl.edu/dbbs/website.nsf/FA/492AFD94078E6ABF86256D4E005B2DE6 of Washington University School of Medicine, found that the diseased state was brought about by the complex interplay among a mutation in an autophagy-related gene called __ATG16L1__, a specific virus, a toxic substance, microbes in the rodent's gut, and...
K. Cadwell, et al., "Virus-Plus-Susceptibility Gene Interaction Determines Crohn's Disease Gene Atg16L1 Phenotypes in Intestine," Cell, 141:1135-45, 2010



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