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German monkey studies nixed

Local lawmakers in Bremen, Germany, are refusing to renew a prominent neuroscientist's license to conduct research on primates, despite the fact that his research was approved by a national regulatory body. The University of Bremen researcher, linkurl:Andreas Kreiter,;http://www.neuro.uni-bremen.de/~brain/staff/eak.htm works with 24 macaques to measure neuronal firing as part of his studies into cognition in the mammalian brain. During local elections last year, the regional parliament, in resp

Andrea Gawrylewski
Local lawmakers in Bremen, Germany, are refusing to renew a prominent neuroscientist's license to conduct research on primates, despite the fact that his research was approved by a national regulatory body. The University of Bremen researcher, linkurl:Andreas Kreiter,;http://www.neuro.uni-bremen.de/~brain/staff/eak.htm works with 24 macaques to measure neuronal firing as part of his studies into cognition in the mammalian brain. During local elections last year, the regional parliament, in response to animal rights activists' protests of Kreiter's research, called on state government to stop the work. This month, the local department that approves animal research informed Kreiter that they would not be renewing his license to conduct the research when it expires at the end of November. "We're all very concerned about what's going on in Bremen," Stefan Treue, director of the German Primate Center in Gottingen, told linkurl:Nature.;http://www.nature.com/news/2008/081027/full/4551159a.html?s=news_rss "To me, this is a flagrant case of political interference with approval...
NatureThe ScientistThe ScientistAlla Katsnelson contributed reporting for this article

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