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Guilty: stem cell researcher

A former member of a high profile stem cell biology research team at the University of Minnesota has been found guilty of falsifying data, a university investigatory panel has ruled. Morayma Reyes, a former PhD student in the lab of prominent stem cell biologist linkurl:Catherine Verfaillie,;http://www.kuleuven.be/cv/u0048658e.htm was under investigation by the university for fabricating data in a linkurl:2002 Nature paper;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?orig_db=PubMed&db=pubmed&cmd=Se

Andrea Gawrylewski
A former member of a high profile stem cell biology research team at the University of Minnesota has been found guilty of falsifying data, a university investigatory panel has ruled. Morayma Reyes, a former PhD student in the lab of prominent stem cell biologist linkurl:Catherine Verfaillie,;http://www.kuleuven.be/cv/u0048658e.htm was under investigation by the university for fabricating data in a linkurl:2002 Nature paper;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?orig_db=PubMed&db=pubmed&cmd=Search&term=%22Nature%22[Jour]%20AND%202002[pdat]%20AND%20Reyes%20M[author] which identified a certain type of bone marrow stem cell capable of giving rise to every type of cell in the body. It was the first time that adult stem cells had been shown to be pluripotent -- only embryonic stem cells had displayed that capability before. After the results were published, other researchers had trouble replicating the findings. Early in 2007, a New Scientist reporter noticed that some data resembled data in a patent claim, data in another paper in the journal Experimental Hematology from 2001, and data in...
BloodNatureExperimental HematologyNatureBloodJournal of Clinical InvestigationNew Scientist

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