Haitian AIDS clinic still standing

The HIV/AIDS clinic in the center of the area of Port-au-Prince hardest hit by yesterday's 7.0 magnitude earthquake is badly damaged but still standing, and most of the center's staff is apparently alive, according to the clinic's director Jean Pape.The GHESKIO center's outerwall in January 2008 "We were very lucky," Pape wrote in a message posted on the Weill Cornell Medical College's linkurl:global health website.;http://www.med.cornell.edu/globalhealth/ "I have heard from most of our staff a

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Jan 12, 2010
The HIV/AIDS clinic in the center of the area of Port-au-Prince hardest hit by yesterday's 7.0 magnitude earthquake is badly damaged but still standing, and most of the center's staff is apparently alive, according to the clinic's director Jean Pape.
The GHESKIO center's outer
wall in January 2008
"We were very lucky," Pape wrote in a message posted on the Weill Cornell Medical College's linkurl:global health website.;http://www.med.cornell.edu/globalhealth/ "I have heard from most of our staff and they are safe." Pape -- whom I visited in Haiti on assignment for __The Scientist__ in 2007 -- started The Haitian Study Group on Kaposi's Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections (GHESKIO) in the early 1980s as the HIV/AIDS epidemic ravaged the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation, and has served as its director since then. My emails to Pape (who goes by "Bill") and other GHESKIO staff went unanswered until late afternoon, and phone service in Haiti...
Jean Pape in January 2008




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