Haute culture

As a young student in 1989, fashionista Suzanne Lee hated science. After years of suffering through labs and tests in high school, the 19 year old Brit fled for art school, soon snuggling into a world of silk, seams, and buckles. But in 2003, while researching a book on future technologies of fashion, Lee bumped into a scientist at an art gallery in London. The chance meeting led to a discussion on the fashion industry's lack of sustainability, and how science, once Lee's arch-nemesis, might be

Megan Scudellari
Jul 29, 2010
As a young student in 1989, fashionista Suzanne Lee hated science. After years of suffering through labs and tests in high school, the 19 year old Brit fled for art school, soon snuggling into a world of silk, seams, and buckles. But in 2003, while researching a book on future technologies of fashion, Lee bumped into a scientist at an art gallery in London. The chance meeting led to a discussion on the fashion industry's lack of sustainability, and how science, once Lee's arch-nemesis, might be the industry's best hope.
BioBiker: Vegetable leather jacket
with black oxidation 'print'

Copyright of the BioCouture Project 2010
"Textiles for clothing is one of the most polluting industries," says Lee, now a senior research fellow at the School of Fashion & Textiles at the Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design in London. Fashion labels typically invest slim to no money in research,...




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