Menu

High-Profile Diabetes Study Retracted

The results, which could not be replicated, suggested that a hormone increased pancreatic β cell proliferation, supplanting insulin as a front-line diabetes treatment in mice.

Dec 28, 2016
Joshua A. Krisch

PIXABAY, STEVEPBIn 2013, Harvard University stem cell researcher Douglas Melton and colleagues described an innovative diabetes treatment that “could augment or replace insulin injections,” they wrote in a study published in Cell. The authors demonstrated that a hormone called betatrophin, or Angiopoietin-like protein 8 (Angptl8), could ramp up pancreatic β cell proliferation in mice, combatting insulin resistance.

But after multiple failed attempts to replicate the findings—and one study by Melton himself, published in PLOS ONECell has retracted the paper. “I wanted to make sure anyone doing a PubMed search would see this is our present view,” Melton told Retraction Watch. “It would be most unfortunate if a lab missed the PLOS ONE paper, then wasted time and effort trying to replicate our results.”

The once promising results began to unravel in 2014, when an independent team of researchers at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals published a paper in Cell that found Angptl8 did not influence β cell expansion. But then in 2015, researchers managed to replicate Melton’s findings in rats.

See “Diabetes 'Breakthrough' Breaks Up

Melton ultimately enlisted two other labs to help conduct a blinded experiment to determine whether his initial findings were correct. The initiative resulted in a PLOS ONE study in July 2016 that concluded that “the original paper describing the betatrophin hypothesis needs to be withdrawn.”

“It’s an example of how scientists can work together when they disagree, and come together to move the field forward,” Melton told Retraction Watch. “The history of science shows it is not a linear path.”

November 2018

Intelligent Science

Wrapping our heads around human smarts

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

LGC announces new, integrated, global portfolio brand, Biosearch Technologies, representing genomic tools for mission critical customer applications

LGC announces new, integrated, global portfolio brand, Biosearch Technologies, representing genomic tools for mission critical customer applications

LGC’s Genomics division announced it is transforming its branding under LGC, Biosearch Technologies, a unified portfolio brand integrating optimised genomic analysis technologies and tools to accelerate scientific outcomes.

DefiniGEN licenses CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology from Broad Institute to develop cell models for optimized metabolic disease drug development

DefiniGEN licenses CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology from Broad Institute to develop cell models for optimized metabolic disease drug development

DefiniGEN Ltd are pleased to announce the commercial licensing of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology from Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in the USA, to develop human cell disease models to support preclinical metabolic disease therapeutic programmes.

Thermo Fisher Scientific: Freezers for Biological Samples

Thermo Fisher Scientific: Freezers for Biological Samples

Fluctuations in temperature can reduce the efficacy, decompose, or shorten the shelf life of biologics. Therefore, it is important to store biologics at the right temperature using standardized protocols.