HIV aids deadly pathogen

Salmonella can wreak havoc in (or kill) people infected with HIV -- and not for the reason scientists have long assumed. Salmonella typhimuriumImage: Wikimedia commons, V. BrinkmannMax Planck Institute for Infection BiologyInstead, a new study in Science shows that Salmonella's ability to cause disease in HIV patients does not appear to stem from a weakened or ineffective immune system, but an overactive one that actively protects the bacteria. The findings may help direct research on developi

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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Apr 21, 2010
Salmonella can wreak havoc in (or kill) people infected with HIV -- and not for the reason scientists have long assumed.
Salmonella typhimurium
Image: Wikimedia commons, V. Brinkmann
Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology
Instead, a new study in Science shows that Salmonella's ability to cause disease in HIV patients does not appear to stem from a weakened or ineffective immune system, but an overactive one that actively protects the bacteria. The findings may help direct research on developing effective vaccines against the pathogen. "In an HIV-infected person, you would expect that if you're not seeing clearance of a pathogen, it's because [the person is] not making any antibodies against that specific pathogen," said immunologist linkurl:Susan Moir;https://ugsp.nih.gov/scholars_mentors/mentors_d.asp?m=07&id=1522 of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases's Laboratory of Immunoregulation. "But they found the opposite -- they found a lot of antibody, but it was directed against the wrong thing."...
SalmonellaSalmonellaSalmonellaSalmonellaSalmonellaSalmonellaSalmonellaSalmonellaSalmonellaC.A. MacLennan, et al., "Dysregulated Humoral Immunity to Nontyphoidal Salmonella in HIV-Infected African Adults," Science, 328:508-12, 2010.



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