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HIV vax testers react to Thai trial

Positive results in an HIV vaccine trial conducted in more than 16,000 Thai volunteers, announced this morning, need to be examined more closely to analyze data on subgroup analyses and specific immune responses so that subsequent trials can absorb that information, says the principal investigator of the only other ongoing efficacy trial of an HIV vaccine. "It's basically a shot in the arm for the HIV vaccine field," Columbia University clinical virologist linkurl:Scott Hammer;http://asp.cpmc.c

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

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Positive results in an HIV vaccine trial conducted in more than 16,000 Thai volunteers, announced this morning, need to be examined more closely to analyze data on subgroup analyses and specific immune responses so that subsequent trials can absorb that information, says the principal investigator of the only other ongoing efficacy trial of an HIV vaccine. "It's basically a shot in the arm for the HIV vaccine field," Columbia University clinical virologist linkurl:Scott Hammer;http://asp.cpmc.columbia.edu/facdb/profile_list.asp?uni=smh48&DepAffil=Medicine told __The Scientist__. "Any positive news out of HIV vaccine work is important." Hammer, who is the PI on the linkurl:HIV Vaccine Trials Network 505;http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00919789?order=22 (HVTN 505) trial, said that he's encouraged by the preliminary results coming out of Thailand -- in that trial the vaccine appears to have decreased HIV infection risk by about 31% -- and that the positive results point to the crucial role of human testing in the development of any vaccine....

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