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Hooray for boobies

I went to the Franklin Institute last night to watch a test screening of linkurl:Galapagos;http://www.mnh.si.edu/expeditions/galapagos/ a 1999 IMAX film that may be returning to the screen in Philadelphia. The movie is gorgeous, presenting the Galapagos islands as a ?little world within themselves? quoting Darwin, and one ?still in the process of creation,? marking the only time the c-word gets used. From the sparse, seemingly uninhabitiable volcanic lava floes, to shorelines teeming with stra

Brendan Maher
I went to the Franklin Institute last night to watch a test screening of linkurl:Galapagos;http://www.mnh.si.edu/expeditions/galapagos/ a 1999 IMAX film that may be returning to the screen in Philadelphia. The movie is gorgeous, presenting the Galapagos islands as a ?little world within themselves? quoting Darwin, and one ?still in the process of creation,? marking the only time the c-word gets used. From the sparse, seemingly uninhabitiable volcanic lava floes, to shorelines teeming with strange reptilian life (and yes, blue-footed boobies), the Galapagos are as fertile a backdrop for sparking the inquisition of scientists today as they were in 1835 when the HMS Beagle visited. The documentary?s main character, marine biologist Carole Baldwin from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, does a nice job of conveying her excitement as she hunts for undiscovered life while retracing some of Darwin?s steps. She goes even further venturing to 3,000 to the ocean floor just...

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