How not to launch a journal

Asking prominent people to serve on a journal's editorial board is no simple task. First, you have to identify the leaders in your field. That usually means reading lots of papers, going to meetings, and speaking to a network of experts you trust, among other strategies. For Bentham Science Publishers Ltd, "a major STM journal publisher of 70 online and print journals, and 4 print/online book (series)" that "answers the informational needs of the pharmaceutical, biomedical and medical research c

Ivan Oransky
Asking prominent people to serve on a journal's editorial board is no simple task. First, you have to identify the leaders in your field. That usually means reading lots of papers, going to meetings, and speaking to a network of experts you trust, among other strategies. For Bentham Science Publishers Ltd, "a major STM journal publisher of 70 online and print journals, and 4 print/online book (series)" that "answers the informational needs of the pharmaceutical, biomedical and medical research community," however, there's evidently an easier way: Search the Internet and blast Emails to everyone vaguely related to your subject. That must be how Bentham found me so that they could extend an invitation to serve on the editorial board of a journal they've just launched called "Recent Patent Reviews on Anti-Infective Drug Discovery." As I sat and scratched my head at the Email request from a few weeks ago, I...

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