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Hwang ghost appears at stem cell conference

The spectre of linkurl:Hwang Woo-Suk;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53277/ has raised its head a couple of times at the annual meeting of the linkurl:International Society for Stem Cell Research;http://www.isscr.org/meetings in Cairns, Australia. On Monday, incoming ISSCR president George Daley, from Children's Hospital Boston, was describing the potential value of deriving stem cells parthenogenetically when he mentioned the name which pricks up everyone's ears. Daley said that ana

Stephen Pincock
The spectre of linkurl:Hwang Woo-Suk;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53277/ has raised its head a couple of times at the annual meeting of the linkurl:International Society for Stem Cell Research;http://www.isscr.org/meetings in Cairns, Australia. On Monday, incoming ISSCR president George Daley, from Children's Hospital Boston, was describing the potential value of deriving stem cells parthenogenetically when he mentioned the name which pricks up everyone's ears. Daley said that analysis of the patterns of centromeric homozygocity in Hwang's cells revealed that they were actually derived from a parthenote, not by linkurl:somatic cell nuclear transfer;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53224/ . Hwang really was the first to do this, Daley told a big crowd at the meeting--which means the South Korean did achieve a world-first, just not the one he said he'd achieved. The shadow of Hwang fell again later in the day, for me at least, when linkurl:Shoukhrat Mitalipov;http://onprc.ohsu.edu/discovery/dspScientistsItem.cfm?doc_id=126 from the Oregon National Primate Research Center took the stage for a last...

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