ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Immunology 2.0: brain, gut?

In order to progress, should the field of immunology look to other organ systems such as the brain and gut, or should it focus its efforts on all that remains unknown about the immune system itself? Macrophage cell in early stages of infectionwith African swine fever virusImage: Wikimedia commons"The major advancements in any field come when branches of science collide," said linkurl:Kevin Tracey,;http://www.feinsteininstitute.org/Feinstein/Laboratory+of+Biomedical+Sciences an immunologist at

Jennifer Welsh
In order to progress, should the field of immunology look to other organ systems such as the brain and gut, or should it focus its efforts on all that remains unknown about the immune system itself?
Macrophage cell in early stages of infection
with African swine fever virus

Image: Wikimedia commons
"The major advancements in any field come when branches of science collide," said linkurl:Kevin Tracey,;http://www.feinsteininstitute.org/Feinstein/Laboratory+of+Biomedical+Sciences an immunologist at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, one of the researchers asked to write their opinion about the future of immunology for the tenth anniversary issue of Nature Immunology. Tracey's interests lie in the intersection of neurophysiology and immunology, which took the spotlight after linkurl:the discovery;http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v405/n6785/full/405458a0.html that action potentials of the vagus nerve regulate the release of cytokines from the spleen and other organs. "That's just the beginning. I think there is going to be a lot of nerves and a...
The ScientistThe Scientist



Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT