Is America competing?

America still produces some of the most well respected science, but with the growth seen in Asia, that may not be the case for much longer, according to linkurl:new data;http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind10/ released from the National Science Foundation (NSF) today (15 January). "Science and technology is no longer the providence of rich developed countries," said Rolf Lehming, director of NSF's Science &Engineering Indicators (S&EI) Program, during a press conference on Wednesday. "That ope

Edyta Zielinska
Jan 14, 2010
America still produces some of the most well respected science, but with the growth seen in Asia, that may not be the case for much longer, according to linkurl:new data;http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind10/ released from the National Science Foundation (NSF) today (15 January). "Science and technology is no longer the providence of rich developed countries," said Rolf Lehming, director of NSF's Science &Engineering Indicators (S&EI) Program, during a press conference on Wednesday. "That opens up opportunities for collaboration. It also brings competitive elements into play," he added.

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At 1.47 million, the number of researchers in the United States is still the highest of all the regions surveyed, but the overall growth from 1995 to 2008 was 3%. The growth in number of researchers in China over the same period was 8.7%, with 1.42 million today, and no signs of slowing, said Lehming. "The time that we had a monopoly on talent,...



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