ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

James Hansen speaks?and maybe says too much

Little did I know what a treat I was getting at last week?s linkurl:conference;http://www.socres.org/polsci/agenda.htm at the New School in New York called "Politics & Science: How their interplay results in public policy." On the second day, attendees heard a meticulous synopsis of the scientific data to support the trend of global warming, presented by James Hansen, the now-beleaguered NASA climate scientist who has accused the U.S. government of suppressing his findings. Hansen ? w

Alison McCook
Little did I know what a treat I was getting at last week?s linkurl:conference;http://www.socres.org/polsci/agenda.htm at the New School in New York called "Politics & Science: How their interplay results in public policy." On the second day, attendees heard a meticulous synopsis of the scientific data to support the trend of global warming, presented by James Hansen, the now-beleaguered NASA climate scientist who has accused the U.S. government of suppressing his findings. Hansen ? whose name was added after I received my conference program -- began his 30-minute presentation by asserting that he was not speaking for NASA or the U.S. government. He then calmly showed figure after figure demonstrating that humans are causing warming at a rate that is "near a point of no return." Specifically, if the situation does not change, by 2050 the earth could enter a feedback loop that creates massive changes, he argued, disrupting the ecology...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT