James Watson on?genomics, rethinking the status quo in academe, job prospects, and predicting the future at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

At the conclusion of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory phage symposium this weekend, James Watson, bedecked in tennis whites, concluded Sunday?s sessions in his inimitable fashion, touching on a range of topics and cutting straight to the point. On the subject of the advanced bacterial genetics course offered annually at CSHL, he believes it should be around for another ten years but wonders if it will be around for a 75th anniversary, since we can?t predict where science will lead us beyond

Nicole Johnston
Jun 26, 2005
At the conclusion of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory phage symposium this weekend, James Watson, bedecked in tennis whites, concluded Sunday?s sessions in his inimitable fashion, touching on a range of topics and cutting straight to the point. On the subject of the advanced bacterial genetics course offered annually at CSHL, he believes it should be around for another ten years but wonders if it will be around for a 75th anniversary, since we can?t predict where science will lead us beyond the forseeable future. ?I don?t know where genomics will take us,? he said, unable to resist adding ?not that anyone in Kansas will be affected by it.?He had this advice for students and faculty alike. It may be time for a rethink of the conventional biological curriculum. ?Even things we can learn may not be worth learning,? he said, then joked, ?I was bored with the Kreb?s cycle...

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