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Journals speed up flu studies

Many top tier science journals are going into overdrive to publish data about the emerging swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus epidemic, compressing what is often a multi-month process into just a few days or weeks. Influenza virusImage: National High Magnetic Field Laboratory,Florida State UniversityAn international research team led by linkurl:Neil Ferguson;http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/people/neil.ferguson/ of Imperial College London published a linkurl:report;http://www.sciencemag.

Elie Dolgin
Many top tier science journals are going into overdrive to publish data about the emerging swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus epidemic, compressing what is often a multi-month process into just a few days or weeks.
Influenza virus
Image: National High Magnetic Field Laboratory,
Florida State University
An international research team led by linkurl:Neil Ferguson;http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/people/neil.ferguson/ of Imperial College London published a linkurl:report;http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/1176062 online today (May 11) in __Science__ showing that the current outbreak is on par or less hazardous than previous influenza pandemics. The researchers analyzed data from late April and found that the virus' transmission rate and clinical severity are not as bad as seen during the 1918 Spanish flu but are similar to other 20th century pandemics. Although the study was received and published in less than a week, "the paper was subjected to usual standards during the rigorous review process," linkurl:Natasha Pinol,;http://www.aaas.org/news/media_contacts/ a __Science__ spokesperson, said in...



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