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Lions, meet BeetleCam

Most wildlife photographers are hesitant to walk straight up to a lion to take its picture. Brothers linkurl:Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas;http://www.burrard-lucas.com/ feel the same way, but that didn't stop them from getting extreme close ups of one of Africa's most fearsome predators. They designed a rugged, remote-controlled camera car that could traverse the African plains, snapping photos of animals as it went, while keeping the brothers at a safe distance, hiding in a bush. Image: linkurl:

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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Most wildlife photographers are hesitant to walk straight up to a lion to take its picture. Brothers linkurl:Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas;http://www.burrard-lucas.com/ feel the same way, but that didn't stop them from getting extreme close ups of one of Africa's most fearsome predators. They designed a rugged, remote-controlled camera car that could traverse the African plains, snapping photos of animals as it went, while keeping the brothers at a safe distance, hiding in a bush.
Image: linkurl:Burrard-Lucas Photography;http://www.burrard-lucas.com
While their linkurl:"BeetleCam";http://blog.burrard-lucas.com/beetlecam/ is not the first camera buggy, capturing such intimate portraits of wildlife is usually achieved through the use of stationary camera traps, says Matt, the younger of the pair and a fulltime chemistry student at Oxford University. "This is a lot more active [so] we can get a much higher success rate." "The idea certainly has got potential," says wildlife photographer linkurl:Nigel Dennis.;http://www.nigeldennis.com/ "Now is a better time to do...




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