Microbes work to mop up oil

Deep sea microbe populations are evolving in response to the Deepwater Horizon disaster, helping to digest the oil that continues to contaminate the Gulf of Mexico, according to a study published today (August 24) on the ScienceExpress website. Bacteria on an oil drop (magnified 100x)Image: © Science/AAASThe findings provide tantalizing clues that the ocean is evolving in a way that will help it heal from the massive spill, but it's still early days, said biogeochemist linkurl:John Farringt

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Aug 23, 2010
Deep sea microbe populations are evolving in response to the Deepwater Horizon disaster, helping to digest the oil that continues to contaminate the Gulf of Mexico, according to a study published today (August 24) on the ScienceExpress website.
Bacteria on an oil drop (magnified 100x)
Image: © Science/AAAS
The findings provide tantalizing clues that the ocean is evolving in a way that will help it heal from the massive spill, but it's still early days, said biogeochemist linkurl:John Farrington;http://www.whoi.edu/profile.do?id=jfarrington of the School of Marine Science and Technology at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, who was not involved in the research. "We shouldn't get all a warm fuzzy feeling that the problem has gone away," Farrington told The Scientist. Recent data out of the Gulf "are very exciting advances in our understanding of spilled oil in the ocean, but there's still a lot of work to be done." By sampling...
Oil droplets dispersed (magnified 100x)
Image: © Science/AAAS
ScienceExpress



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