Minding the human genome gap

Many of the unsequenced gaps in the human genome arise because their DNA sequences cannot be read by the bacteria used in traditional sequencing methods, according to a linkurl:paper;http://genomebiology.com/2009/10/6/R60 published last week in __Genome Biology__. In the paper, a team of Broad Institute researchers report a simple, new way to fill in those gaps using next-generation sequencing technology. Image: Wikimedia Commons"There are some regions of the genome which bacteria don't like,"

Elie Dolgin
Jun 8, 2009
Many of the unsequenced gaps in the human genome arise because their DNA sequences cannot be read by the bacteria used in traditional sequencing methods, according to a linkurl:paper;http://genomebiology.com/2009/10/6/R60 published last week in __Genome Biology__. In the paper, a team of Broad Institute researchers report a simple, new way to fill in those gaps using next-generation sequencing technology.
Image: Wikimedia Commons
"There are some regions of the genome which bacteria don't like," linkurl:Lincoln Stein,;http://www.oicr.on.ca/Research/stein.htm a bioinformatician at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research in Toronto who was not involved in the research, told __The Scientist__. "Those have been unsequenceable until recently when the next generation of sequencing machines, which do not require a cloning step, became available." The human genome was declared "finished" nearly a decade ago, but the 3 billion nucleotide sequence is still riddled with holes. Broad computational biologist linkurl:Manuel Garber;http://broad.harvard.edu/compbio/team.html and his colleagues set out to fix...




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