Nanotech sets sail

This week, Planktos, a nanotech company with the lofty goal of reducing carbon emissions, finally set sail. Planktos aims to reduce carbon emissions by releasing huge amounts of iron into the ocean, with the hope that plankton will take up that iron, and absorb more carbon. According to the New York Times, Planktos' 115-foot ship, the WeatherBird II, linkurl:launched from Florida;http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/project-to-harness-plankton-puts-to-sea/index.html on Sunday (Novem

Alison McCook
Nov 7, 2007
This week, Planktos, a nanotech company with the lofty goal of reducing carbon emissions, finally set sail. Planktos aims to reduce carbon emissions by releasing huge amounts of iron into the ocean, with the hope that plankton will take up that iron, and absorb more carbon. According to the New York Times, Planktos' 115-foot ship, the WeatherBird II, linkurl:launched from Florida;http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/project-to-harness-plankton-puts-to-sea/index.html on Sunday (November 4). In this month's issue, bioethics columnist linkurl:Glenn McGee;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/11/1/33/1/ expressed concerns about Planktos, arguing that the technology is too much of a question mark to be deemed safe. Early findings weren't encouraging, and scientists and environmentalists have dismissed the company's claims. What are the long-term implications of releasing this plankton? How will the current carry the particles? How will this massive amount of extra iron affect plankton plumes? McGee asked. Looks like we may soon find out.

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