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Nature got lucky, and so did I

I found out today that I got lucky. Human cloning has always received the lion's share of headlines, but I've always been more fascinated by the cloning of the lions ? animal cloning, in particular the quirky but earnest gang that would like to clone your pet for royal sums. So I might have felt vindicated by today's news ? which I reported on linkurl:here;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/22933/ ? that while Woo-Suk Hwang's claims on human cloning were based on fraud, his cloning of lin

Ivan Oransky
I found out today that I got lucky. Human cloning has always received the lion's share of headlines, but I've always been more fascinated by the cloning of the lions ? animal cloning, in particular the quirky but earnest gang that would like to clone your pet for royal sums. So I might have felt vindicated by today's news ? which I reported on linkurl:here;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/22933/ ? that while Woo-Suk Hwang's claims on human cloning were based on fraud, his cloning of linkurl:Snuppy;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/22746/ had been verified. After all, I'd covered Snuppy, but had only mentioned the human cloning papers in a year-end round-up story after serious questions had already been raised about linkurl:the work;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15895/.Similarly, __Nature__, which published the original report on Snuppy, might be feeling like kings of the jungle, while __Science__, which published the human cloning studies, might be feeling like it's in the doghouse. That's the unspoken thread of...

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