NIH boost passed in Senate

The US Senate passed its version of the economic stimulus legislation today (Feb. 10), and life science has faired well, according to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). "For the science and engineering community, the two versions of the stimulus bill are a welcome acknowledgement that scientific research, often regarded as long-term and future-oriented, also has a role to play in short-term economic recovery," the AAAS wrote in an linkurl:analysis;http://www.aaas.or

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

View full profile.


Learn about our editorial policies.

Feb 9, 2009
The US Senate passed its version of the economic stimulus legislation today (Feb. 10), and life science has faired well, according to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). "For the science and engineering community, the two versions of the stimulus bill are a welcome acknowledgement that scientific research, often regarded as long-term and future-oriented, also has a role to play in short-term economic recovery," the AAAS wrote in an linkurl:analysis;http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/stim09s2.htm#tb of the legislation. The advocacy group estimated that the $838 billion Senate version of bill would give more than $10 billion to the National Institutes of Health, thanks to an amendment to the original Senate version proposed by Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA) last week. The House version of the bill, which was passed last month, would provide only $3.9 billion in stimulus finding to the NIH, the same amount included in the original Senate version. If the...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?