NIH: Gene therapy didn't cause death

An experimental gene therapy treatment did not cause a patient's linkurl:death;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53453/ earlier this year, according to a federal advisory committee. The National Institutes of Health's Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee announced the findings this morning (Dec. 3) and made recommendations to alter the design of the study, which was cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration to linkurl:resume;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53886/ last week.

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Dec 2, 2007
An experimental gene therapy treatment did not cause a patient's linkurl:death;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53453/ earlier this year, according to a federal advisory committee. The National Institutes of Health's Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee announced the findings this morning (Dec. 3) and made recommendations to alter the design of the study, which was cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration to linkurl:resume;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53886/ last week. Building upon preliminary findings, which __The Scientist__ linkurl:reported;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53593/ in September, the RAC presented additional data fingering a systemic linkurl:fungal infection;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53589/ and massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage as the primary causes of 36-year-old Jolee Mohr's death in July. RAC chairman Howard Federoff suggested that the trial should boost hematological monitoring of patients and said that the treatment should not be administered to patients who show physiological signs of infection prior to treatment, or those who have histories of opportunistic infection. Federoff also said that informed consent forms in this study should be revised...

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