NIH grants for human microbe work

The National Institutes of Health linkurl:launched;http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/dec2007/od-19.htm a project today (Dec. 19) aimed at linkurl:sequencing;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53647/ the myriad linkurl:microbes;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53643/ that inhabit the human body. NIH has already awarded several millions of dollars in grant money to researchers engaging in the Human Microbiome Project, and linkurl:more grant money;http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp/grants

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Dec 18, 2007
The National Institutes of Health linkurl:launched;http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/dec2007/od-19.htm a project today (Dec. 19) aimed at linkurl:sequencing;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53647/ the myriad linkurl:microbes;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53643/ that inhabit the human body. NIH has already awarded several millions of dollars in grant money to researchers engaging in the Human Microbiome Project, and linkurl:more grant money;http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp/grants.asp is available. A total of $150 million in grants will be available over the next five years to researchers developing technologies and data analysis tools, undertaking demonstration projects, and studying the ethical, legal, and social implications of the effort. Editor's note (posted Dec 19): This blog has been updated from a previous version.

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