Nobel hopefuls by the numbers

The researcher who developed induced pluripotent stem cells, the biochemist who invented DNA microarrays, and the immunologist who discovered dendritic cells are just a few of the scientists whose citation records are robust enough to attract a Nobel Prize this year, according to Thomson Reuters, the company that manages the Web of Science citation indexing tool -- brainchild of __The Scientist__ founder Eugene Garfield. The company released their 2010 Nobel Prize linkurl:predictions;http://scie

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Sep 20, 2010
The researcher who developed induced pluripotent stem cells, the biochemist who invented DNA microarrays, and the immunologist who discovered dendritic cells are just a few of the scientists whose citation records are robust enough to attract a Nobel Prize this year, according to Thomson Reuters, the company that manages the Web of Science citation indexing tool -- brainchild of __The Scientist__ founder Eugene Garfield. The company released their 2010 Nobel Prize linkurl:predictions;http://science.thomsonreuters.com/nobel/ today (21st September).
For the past 8 years, Thomson Reuters, has thrown its hat into the ring, publishing the names of "Citation Laureates" -- a list of researchers that are potential recipients of that year's Nobel Prizes, based on an analysis of 30 years of citation counts. Thomson Reuters citation analyst David Pendlebury performs these calculations, and is in charge of putting the list together every year. "I'm always hopeful, and yet I'm usually surprised if we get...

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