ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Old mice wanted

Interested in getting in on some big cash prizes but don?t have the linkurl:sequencing capacity;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23051/ or rocketry experience to compete in the more well known linkurl:X-prize competitions;http://www.xprizefoundation.com/? If you?re good with mice, all you might need is time. In putting together the linkurl:March feature on aging;http://www.the-scientist.com/2006/3/1/28/1/ by S. Jay Olshansky and colleagues we came across the Methuselah Mouse Prize

Brendan Maher
Interested in getting in on some big cash prizes but don?t have the linkurl:sequencing capacity;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23051/ or rocketry experience to compete in the more well known linkurl:X-prize competitions;http://www.xprizefoundation.com/? If you?re good with mice, all you might need is time. In putting together the linkurl:March feature on aging;http://www.the-scientist.com/2006/3/1/28/1/ by S. Jay Olshansky and colleagues we came across the Methuselah Mouse Prize or M-prize. Funded by private donors, the M-prize is brainchild of linkurl:Aubrey de Grey,;http://www.gen.cam.ac.uk/sens/AdGbio.htm the Cambridge geneticist who contends that with proper maintenance (yet undiscovered), humans could live for hundreds or even thousands of years. The linkurl:prize;http://www.mprize.org/ is awarded in two categories that have been variously named over the years but currently go by longevity and rejuvenation. The longevity prize rewards researchers that have bred, engineered, or otherwise reared the longest living mouse, and the prize amount is a percentage of the total prize fund available calculated by how much one...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT