One step to human pluripotency

Researchers have regressed human stem cells to an embryonic state using just a single transcription factor, as opposed to the four factors previously needed to induce pluripotency in human cells, according to a study published online today (August 28) in Nature. Human embryonic stem cellsImage: Wikimedia commons, Nissim Benvenisty"This is another important milestone of [stem cell] research," linkurl:Kwang-Soo Kim,;http://www.mclean.harvard.edu/about/bios/detail.php?username=kskim a stem cell r

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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Aug 27, 2009
Researchers have regressed human stem cells to an embryonic state using just a single transcription factor, as opposed to the four factors previously needed to induce pluripotency in human cells, according to a study published online today (August 28) in Nature.
Human embryonic stem cells
Image: Wikimedia commons,
Nissim Benvenisty
"This is another important milestone of [stem cell] research," linkurl:Kwang-Soo Kim,;http://www.mclean.harvard.edu/about/bios/detail.php?username=kskim a stem cell researcher at McLean Hospital of Harvard Medical School, wrote in an email to The Scientist. "This elegant work further advances the already fast-moving field and demonstrates that human [induced pluripotent stem (iPS)] cells can be generated with [a] minimal number of retroviral vectors," added Kim, who was not involved in the work. Earlier this year, linkurl:Hans Schöler;http://www.mpi-muenster.mpg.de/ncd/cde.shtml of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine in Münster, Germany, and his colleagues succeeded in using just a single transcription factor, OCT4, to revert mouse...
OCT4OCT4KLF4OCT4c-MycThe Scientist



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