Menu

Opioid Receptors Implicated in PTSD

A compound that targets a particular opioid receptor in the amygdala reduces the formation of PTSD-like systems in mice subjected to severe trauma.

Jun 7, 2013
Dan Cossins

WIKIMEDIA, BAGHDADResearchers have identified an opioid receptor gene whose expression is altered in the brains of mice subjected to severe stress. Furthermore, treating mice with a compound that targets this receptor prevented the development of excess anxiety and fear, symptoms similar to those of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The findings, published this week (June 6) in Science, point to a new drug target for the treatment of PTSD in humans.

The molecular mechanisms in the brain that drive PTSD are not well understood, though recent studies have suggested that pain-relieving opioids might inhibit the development of the disorder. Evidence to back that up came from work by Kerry Ressler of Emory University in Atlanta and colleagues, who were studying gene expression in the mouse amygdala—a part of the brain is activated by fear and stress. They found that a gene called Oprl1 (opioid receptor-like 1), which encodes the receptor for an opioid called nociceptin, is more active in mice subjected to extreme stress than in controls.

Ressler and colleagues then teamed up with another group to test the effects of a compound called SR-8993, which selectively activates the nociceptin receptor. They found that when injected in the amygdala of mice shortly after a stressful experience, SR-8993 inhibited the formation of fear memories. It’s not clear if the same would apply in humans, of course. But the researchers did find that, of 1,800 people who have experienced high levels of violence and trauma in their lives, people who carry a particular variant of Oprl1 tended to suffer from more severe PTSD than those who did not have the variant.

“While many hurdles remain for SR-8993 or a related compound to become a drug used to prevent PTSD, these results are important first steps in understanding how such treatments may be effective,” study coauthor Thomas Bannister of the Scripps Research Institute in Florida said in a press release.

(Hat tip to Only Human)

January 2019

Cannabis on Board

Research suggests ill effects of cannabinoids in the womb

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

WIN a VIAFLO 96/384 to supercharge your microplate pipetting!
WIN a VIAFLO 96/384 to supercharge your microplate pipetting!
INTEGRA Biosciences is offering labs the chance to win a VIAFLO 96/384 pipette. Designed to simplify plate replication, plate reformatting or reservoir-to-plate transfers, the VIAFLO 96/384 allows labs without the space or budget for an expensive pipetting robot to increase the speed and throughput of routine tasks.
FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX has announced that their digital PCR assets, including the CONSTELLATION® series of instruments, is being acquired by QIAGEN N.V. (NYSE: QGEN, Frankfurt Stock Exchange: QIA) for up to $260 million ($125 million upfront payment and $135 million of milestones).  QIAGEN has announced plans for a global launch in 2020 of a new series of digital PCR platforms that utilize the advanced dPCR technology developed by FORMULATRIX combined with QIAGEN’s expertise in assay development and automation.
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
With this application note from Taconic, learn about the power that the CRISPR/Cas system has to revolutionize the field of custom mouse model generation!
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
This webinar, from Crown Bioscience, presents a unique continuum of translational dysmetabolic platforms that more closely mimic human disease. Learn about using next-generation rodent and spontaneously diabetic non-human primate models to accurately model human-relevant disease progression and complications related to obesity and diabetes here!