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p53 and the sea

The 18th Lorne Cancer Conference Erskine on the Beach in Lorne, Australia, closed today, but not before p53 competed with the scenery for scientists' attention. Just as the linkurl:Keystone Symposia;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23090/ are set up to allow for skiing in the afternoon, Lorne is set up to nice long break in the middle of the day during which delegates play tennis on grass courts, swim at the sweeping beach across the road or just laze on the grass in the sun. Tony Brai

Stephen Pincock
The 18th Lorne Cancer Conference Erskine on the Beach in Lorne, Australia, closed today, but not before p53 competed with the scenery for scientists' attention. Just as the linkurl:Keystone Symposia;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23090/ are set up to allow for skiing in the afternoon, Lorne is set up to nice long break in the middle of the day during which delegates play tennis on grass courts, swim at the sweeping beach across the road or just laze on the grass in the sun. Tony Braithwaite, from the University of Otago, in New Zealand, reported on efforts to figure out the role of p53's N-terminal polyproline domain in apoptosis. Looking at mice with a homozygous deletion in the proline rich region showed that they showed no evidence of spontaneous tumor formation. 'Either apoptosis is not the critical determiner of tumor suppression by p53,' he said, 'or the polyproline domain is not essential for apoptosis.' The...

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