Peer reviewed, or just blogged?

A University of California, San Diego communications professor is starting an unusual experiment today (Jan 22): He's testing whether a large online community of academic bloggers are better at peer review than a few hand-picked experts. To compare the two review methods, Noah Wardrip-Fruin is posting excerpts from his new book about video games onto the linkurl:blog;http://grandtextauto.org/ Grand Text Auto, run by himself and five colleagues. He linkurl:told;http://chronicle.com/free/2008

Alison McCook
Jan 21, 2008
A University of California, San Diego communications professor is starting an unusual experiment today (Jan 22): He's testing whether a large online community of academic bloggers are better at peer review than a few hand-picked experts. To compare the two review methods, Noah Wardrip-Fruin is posting excerpts from his new book about video games onto the linkurl:blog;http://grandtextauto.org/ Grand Text Auto, run by himself and five colleagues. He linkurl:told;http://chronicle.com/free/2008/01/1322n.htm the Chronicle of Higher Education that the blog attracts academic scholars and video-game players, and receives up to 200,000 visitors per month. "This is the community whose response I want, not just the small circle of academics," he told the Chronicle. He is using a tool called CommentPress to allow bloggers to add notes to the excerpts. Wardrip-Fruin's editor at MIT Press is simultaneously running the book through traditional peer review, to enable the author to compare both evaluation methods. Can't...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?