PNAS butterfly flap heats up

The __Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences__ has halted the print publication of a controversial scientific paper, saying it's investigating the conditions under which it was ushered through peer review by a distinguished academy member who advocated for its inclusion in the journal. The linkurl:paper;http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/08/25/0908357106.abstract, written by University of Liverpool researcher linkurl:Donald Williamson,;http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/bios/williamso

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Sep 30, 2009
The __Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences__ has halted the print publication of a controversial scientific paper, saying it's investigating the conditions under which it was ushered through peer review by a distinguished academy member who advocated for its inclusion in the journal. The linkurl:paper;http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/08/25/0908357106.abstract, written by University of Liverpool researcher linkurl:Donald Williamson,;http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/bios/williamson.html posited that butterflies are the evolutionary result of a long-ago mating between worm-like and winged ancestors. It appeared in the early edition on __PNAS__'s website on August 28th and was to appear in the print version of the journal soon. But according to the linkurl:__Times Higher Education__,;http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=408496&c=1 __PNAS__ has decided to hold up on printing the study after a flood of negative reactions from biologists about the paper and the journal's practice of allowing academy members to "communicate" manuscripts as a way to speed their publication. __PNAS__ linkurl:announced;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55970/ last month that it would be doing away...

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