Poetic justice for Watson?

There's an interesting "P.S." to the story of James Watson's early retirement after public outcry when he told a UK newspaper that he believed people of African ancestry were less intelligent - he has 16 times more genes of African origin than the average Caucasian. The company deCODE Genetics performed the analysis using Watson's entire genome, which he linkurl:released publicly;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53415/ this year. "This level is what you wou

Alison McCook
Dec 10, 2007
There's an interesting "P.S." to the story of James Watson's early retirement after public outcry when he told a UK newspaper that he believed people of African ancestry were less intelligent - he has 16 times more genes of African origin than the average Caucasian. The company deCODE Genetics performed the analysis using Watson's entire genome, which he linkurl:released publicly;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53415/ this year. "This level is what you would expect in someone who had a great-grandparent who was African," linkurl:Kari Stefansson;http://news.independent.co.uk/sci_tech/article3239366.ece of deCODE Genetics told The Independent. "It was very surprising to get this result for Jim." Stefansson linkurl:visited;http://science-community.sciam.com/thread.jspa?threadID=300005381 the offices of Scientific American weeks ago to discuss the project. In October, Watson linkurl:stepped down;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53766/ as chancellor of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York after his remarks, which sparked strong public criticism. Neither Stefansson nor a representative of deCODE Genetics responded to requests for comment and a copy of...

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