Polar researchers fouling nature

Research stations in Antarctica are sullying the pristine environment by improperly disposing of sewage waste, reports linkurl:a study;http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121413758/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0 published this month in Polar Research. Downtown McMurdo Station Image: Wikimedia Commons via linkurl:Flickr;http://www.flickr.com/photos/elisfanclub/tags/mcmurdo/ The study found that more than half of the research stations that operate on the continent lack sewage systems to prop

Alla Katsnelson
Aug 13, 2009
Research stations in Antarctica are sullying the pristine environment by improperly disposing of sewage waste, reports linkurl:a study;http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121413758/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0 published this month in Polar Research.
Downtown McMurdo Station
Image: Wikimedia Commons via linkurl:Flickr;http://www.flickr.com/photos/elisfanclub/tags/mcmurdo/
The study found that more than half of the research stations that operate on the continent lack sewage systems to properly treat and dispose of waste water. Fredrik Gröndahl of the linkurl:Royal Institute of Technology;http://www.ima.kth.se/personal/fg.htm in Stockholm, who led the study, said it should serve as a "wake-up call" to scientists working in the region. Twenty-eight countries have a total of total of 82 research stations in the Earth's southern-most landmass, and "they need to take action to prevent the release of microorganisms to the Antarctic environment," he told The Scientist. "This could be a big problem." Explorers and scientists have been traveling to Antarctica for more than 100 years, and since 1959 it has been...




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