Public choosing science on PBS

The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is living up to its name, and asking the public to choose what they want to see about science. On Wednesday nights at 8 PM in January, the channel is broadcasting pilot episodes from three different TV series about science, and asking the public to decide which program deserves its own series on PBS. We have three options: "Wired Science" adopts content from Wired magazine, "Science Investigators" answers a series of scientific questions

Alison McCook
Jan 7, 2007
The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is living up to its name, and asking the public to choose what they want to see about science. On Wednesday nights at 8 PM in January, the channel is broadcasting pilot episodes from three different TV series about science, and asking the public to decide which program deserves its own series on PBS. We have three options: "Wired Science" adopts content from Wired magazine, "Science Investigators" answers a series of scientific questions such as "What can DNA from a more than 30,000-year-old Neanderthal man tell us about ourselves?," and the pilot "22nd Century" explores how the world could work in the future. This week, the channel broadcasted "Wired Science," which covered a range of topics stretching from space to the bottom of the ocean. With one hour at its disposal, the program adopts the slow, plodding pace typical of linkurl:public television;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/7943/, taking time to...

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