Q&A: Do we need stem cell bank?

Among stem cell policy changes instituted since U.S. President Barack Obama took office, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) made a linkurl:controversial move;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57274/ to not renew funding of a key stem cell bank established at the linkurl:WiCell Institute;http://www.wicell.org/ in Wisconsin. Many scientists worry that without a national center to distribute human embryonic stem cell lines to researchers, the availability, cost and quality of cell line

Jennifer Welsh
Jul 26, 2010
Among stem cell policy changes instituted since U.S. President Barack Obama took office, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) made a linkurl:controversial move;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57274/ to not renew funding of a key stem cell bank established at the linkurl:WiCell Institute;http://www.wicell.org/ in Wisconsin. Many scientists worry that without a national center to distribute human embryonic stem cell lines to researchers, the availability, cost and quality of cell lines will suffer as a result. But not all feel this way.
Evan Snyder, stem cell
biologist at Sanford Burnham Institute

Image provided by Evan Snyder
The Scientist spoke with linkurl:Evan Snyder,;http://www.sanfordburnham.org/labs/Snyder/ a stem cell biologist from the Burnham Institute for Regenerative Medicine in San Diego, who says he doesn't believe the community needs a nationally funded bank. Snyder, whose research focuses on the basic biology of stem cells and their potential applications, believes that in these tough financial times, researchers should do their academic duty...
The ScientistEvan SnyderTSESTSESTSESTSESTSESTSES




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