Research boom in developing world

Science funding in developing countries grew three times more rapidly than in developed countries between 2002 and 2007, says a linkurl:report;http://www.uis.unesco.org/ev.php?ID=7793_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC released last week (October 6) from the UNESCO Institute of Statistics in Montreal, Canada. But a country-by-country analysis shows that not all developing regions consider supporting research a priority. Image: CIA World Factbook "I am delighted with the increase in funding," said linkurl:Mohame

Katherine Bagley
Oct 12, 2009
Science funding in developing countries grew three times more rapidly than in developed countries between 2002 and 2007, says a linkurl:report;http://www.uis.unesco.org/ev.php?ID=7793_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC released last week (October 6) from the UNESCO Institute of Statistics in Montreal, Canada. But a country-by-country analysis shows that not all developing regions consider supporting research a priority.
Image: CIA World Factbook
"I am delighted with the increase in funding," said linkurl:Mohamed H.A. Hassan,;http://www.interacademycouncil.net/?id=10084 executive director of the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World, an international organization that promotes science-based sustainable development. However, he said, "we have a long way to go in our efforts to build both capacity and excellence in science in developing countries." Developing countries more than doubled their annual spending on research and development between 2002 and 2007, from $135 billion to $274 billion. That spending accounted for 24% of the world's total R&D budget in 2007, an increase of 7% from 2002....




Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?