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Research gems in Botswana

Gaborone, the capital of Botswana, is a small city with roughly 200,000 residents. After Windhoek in linkurl:Namibia;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23270/, where I was yesterday, it seems a little rough around the edges. I'm in town as part of a 10 day linkurl:trip to Africa;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23265/ on behalf of The Scientist to talk to researchers about the linkurl:state of science;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23266/ on the continent. The city ma

Stephen Pincock
Gaborone, the capital of Botswana, is a small city with roughly 200,000 residents. After Windhoek in linkurl:Namibia;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23270/, where I was yesterday, it seems a little rough around the edges. I'm in town as part of a 10 day linkurl:trip to Africa;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23265/ on behalf of The Scientist to talk to researchers about the linkurl:state of science;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23266/ on the continent. The city may be a bit scruffy, but The University of Botswana, situated close to the center of town, is not at all shabby--certainly not the department of science, which I was able to visit today (Saturday). The science faculty buildings date to 1992, and in terms of equipment, facilities and so on aren't vastly different to many departments I've visited in the West. Each year, the faculty has an intake of roughly 900 students. Plus, there is more than a smattering of MSc, MPhil and PhD students. The academics, including 25...

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