Retracted: highly cited paper

Two papers (one highly cited) on the mechanism of estrogen signaling have been retracted after an investigation by Wyeth found that the research data of its former employee Boris Cheskis were "unreliable." Image: Wikimedia commonsThe retractions do "clear up an area of uncertainty," said molecular endocrinologist linkurl:David Ray;http://www.medicine.manchester.ac.uk/staff/DavidRay of the University of Manchester School of Medicine, whose studies on a related topic conflicted with the now-retr

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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Apr 25, 2010
Two papers (one highly cited) on the mechanism of estrogen signaling have been retracted after an investigation by Wyeth found that the research data of its former employee Boris Cheskis were "unreliable."
Image: Wikimedia commons
The retractions do "clear up an area of uncertainty," said molecular endocrinologist linkurl:David Ray;http://www.medicine.manchester.ac.uk/staff/DavidRay of the University of Manchester School of Medicine, whose studies on a related topic conflicted with the now-retracted findings. "You don't want [to spend] your whole career refuting other people's work; you want to be figuring out entirely new stuff for yourself." The primary action of steroid receptors, such as the estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoid receptors, is to regulate transcription when bound by a natural or drug ligand. When the ligands bind, however, there are many cellular effects that occur more rapidly than could be mediated through gene expression, Ray explained, suggesting these receptors may have other ways of effecting changes...
Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesPNASThe ScientistPNASThe ScientistMolecular and Cellular BiologyMCB

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