Schools in energy states flourish

Science programs in many state schools are feeling the pinch of hard times, but there's an exception to the suffering: Universities in big energy-producing states are thriving, with some even gaining a competitive edge over their hurting counterparts by luring senior level faculty. Times are tough at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK). After taking a 5.8% hit in their approximately $750 million budget last year, they are facing an 8 to 20% cut in state funding this year, said Willia

Tia Ghose
Mar 17, 2009
Science programs in many state schools are feeling the pinch of hard times, but there's an exception to the suffering: Universities in big energy-producing states are thriving, with some even gaining a competitive edge over their hurting counterparts by luring senior level faculty. Times are tough at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK). After taking a 5.8% hit in their approximately $750 million budget last year, they are facing an 8 to 20% cut in state funding this year, said William Dunne, the dean of the college of arts and sciences there. His college houses many of the biological sciences, and 33% of its $114 million budget comes from the state, he said. In response to the cuts, UTK is hiking tuition by 9%, eliminating lecturer positions, and asking tenured and tenure-track faculty to teach larger classes with more lab sections. The school is also cutting funds for...
UNT Wills Library
Image: afroswede/flickr
Warren Burggren
University of Wyoming
Image: omnivoreceo/flickr
Bill GernPaul LeBelBarry Milavetz
Grand Forks, North Dakota
Image: tuey/flickr




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