Science: Auto-tuned

It's Carl Sagan like you've never heard him: his digitized, remixed voice sounds more like something emanating from a radio tuned to a pop music station than from a TV playing a public television documentary. Footage of the scientist in his award-winning PBS series linkurl:Cosmos;http://www.hulu.com/cosmos mingles with stunning computer animations depicting complex scientific concepts. This is all part of a novel project called linkurl:Symphony of Science,;http://www.symphonyofscience.com/index.

Katherine Bagley
Feb 4, 2010
It's Carl Sagan like you've never heard him: his digitized, remixed voice sounds more like something emanating from a radio tuned to a pop music station than from a TV playing a public television documentary. Footage of the scientist in his award-winning PBS series linkurl:Cosmos;http://www.hulu.com/cosmos mingles with stunning computer animations depicting complex scientific concepts. This is all part of a novel project called linkurl:Symphony of Science,;http://www.symphonyofscience.com/index.html which is meant to bring science to the masses with the use of modern media. Nearly five million YouTube users have already tuned in to watch. Symphony of Science was created in 2009 by John Boswell, a Washington-based electronic musician that specializes in audio remixing. Boswell was a sophomore at Western Washington University when he stumbled upon Sagan's __Cosmos__ series late one night on the Discovery channel. "I immediately fell in love with the show, like so many people did," he told...




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