Science crime: A recent history

Last Friday, biology professor Amy Bishop shocked the country when she linkurl:allegedly shot and killed;http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/13/us/13alabama.html?emc=eta1 three of her colleagues at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, purportedly motivated by the university's recent decision to deny her tenure. Although certainly one of the most heinous crimes in recent memory, it is by no means the first criminal offense to disturb the scientific community. Here is a timeline of some disquieting

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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Feb 15, 2010
Last Friday, biology professor Amy Bishop shocked the country when she linkurl:allegedly shot and killed;http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/13/us/13alabama.html?emc=eta1 three of her colleagues at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, purportedly motivated by the university's recent decision to deny her tenure. Although certainly one of the most heinous crimes in recent memory, it is by no means the first criminal offense to disturb the scientific community. Here is a timeline of some disquieting events from the last few years:
Image: Wikimedia commons,
Jim Kuhn
September 27, 2009: University of Maryland pharmacologist Clinton McCracken linkurl:admitted to having bought a narcotic;http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bal-md.mccracken10dec10,0,5196072.story?track=rs known as buprenorphine from an online company in the Philippines after his live-in fiancé, University of Maryland School of Medicine postdoc Carrie Elisabeth John, died of what was initially believed to be an overdose on the drug. Although John's autopsy later revealed that she had no drugs in her system -- instead, cause of death...
September 13, 2009:August 26, 2009:November 10, 2008:August 6, 2008:July 19, 2006:March 30, 2004:



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