Science paper pulled

Researchers are retracting a highly-cited linkurl:2004 Science paper;http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/303/5656/371 describing a new way of adding sugars to proteins -- a longstanding challenge in molecular biology -- citing their inability to repeat the results and the absence of the original lab notebooks with the experiment details, they linkurl:announced;http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/326/5957/1187-a in Science last Thursday (November 26). Image: Wikimedia commons"

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

View full profile.


Learn about our editorial policies.

Nov 29, 2009
Researchers are retracting a highly-cited linkurl:2004 Science paper;http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/303/5656/371 describing a new way of adding sugars to proteins -- a longstanding challenge in molecular biology -- citing their inability to repeat the results and the absence of the original lab notebooks with the experiment details, they linkurl:announced;http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/326/5957/1187-a in Science last Thursday (November 26).
Image: Wikimedia commons
"It is unfortunate that they cannot repeat it," said biochemist linkurl:Lai-Xi Wang;http://medschool.umaryland.edu/FACULTYRESEARCHPROFILE/viewprofile.aspx?id=7742 of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, who did not participate in the retracted research. "This method opened a new avenue for the preparation of glycoproteins [with] huge potential in this field." Glycosylation, the addition of sugars to proteins, is a common posttranslational modification that is found on some 70% of human proteins. It can affect a variety of protein functions, including folding and biomolecular recognition, but the exact relationship between the structural and functional changes remains elusive. One of the reasons...
ScienceE. coliThe ScientistJournal of the American Chemical Society (JACS)ScienceJACSScienceJACS



Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?