Science speaks about cloning controversy

At a press conference today (December 16), Science editor-in-chief Donald Kennedy and deputy editor for life sciences Katrina Kelner presented their side of the story in the ongoing controversy over a cloning paper the journal published this year.Since the article, last author Gerald Schatten of the University of Pittsburgh has pulled out of a collaboration with his Korean co-authors, and first author Woo-suk Hwang admitted to both illegally obtaining eggs and tampering with images. Both Sch

Alison McCook
Dec 15, 2005
At a press conference today (December 16), Science editor-in-chief Donald Kennedy and deputy editor for life sciences Katrina Kelner presented their side of the story in the ongoing controversy over a cloning paper the journal published this year.Since the article, last author Gerald Schatten of the University of Pittsburgh has pulled out of a collaboration with his Korean co-authors, and first author Woo-suk Hwang admitted to both illegally obtaining eggs and tampering with images. Both Schatten and Hwang have since requested the journal retract the paper, once they obtain permission from the other co-authors. Science and Seoul National University (SNU), Hwang?s institution, are investigating the research.During the conference, Kennedy defended the journal?s peer review process. Although the study was accepted faster than average, it was reviewed by more than the average number of reviewers, who looked over edits before publication. ?At the time of publication, we felt on ethically...

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