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Scientists Without Borders

Have you ever wondered how your day-to-day work in the lab can contribute to health and science efforts in the developing world? The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) is inviting scientists to offer up their skills and resources toward an effort called "Scientists Without Borders," an online portal that will go live this spring. Not only will researchers be able to offer their skills and expertise, they can also set up collaborations and request patient samples or specimens from organizations

Edyta Zielinska
Have you ever wondered how your day-to-day work in the lab can contribute to health and science efforts in the developing world? The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) is inviting scientists to offer up their skills and resources toward an effort called "Scientists Without Borders," an online portal that will go live this spring. Not only will researchers be able to offer their skills and expertise, they can also set up collaborations and request patient samples or specimens from organizations in the developing world, said Evelyn Strauss, executive director of the program. "This will allow people to match needs with resources." As of today, more than 470 individuals, 85 organizations, and 56 Projects have registered. NYAS isn't the only organization trying to connect scientists with projects in the developing world. In a 2006 article in __The Scientist__, linkurl:Harold Varmus;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23543/ described another initiative called linkurl:Global Career Corps;http://www.msi-sig.org/scicorp.html that aims to...

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