Single-factor stem cells

In the latest milestone on the road toward reprogramming cells to pluripotency without permanent genetic modification, researchers have successfully turned the clock back on adult stem cells using only a single transcription factor, according to a study published today (Feb. 5) in__ linkurl:Cell.;http://www.cell.com/ __Ever since Kyoto University's linkurl:Shinya Yamanaka;http://www.frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/rc02/kyojuE.html showed in 2006 that the overexpression of just four genes -- c-Myc, Sox2,

Elie Dolgin
Feb 4, 2009
In the latest milestone on the road toward reprogramming cells to pluripotency without permanent genetic modification, researchers have successfully turned the clock back on adult stem cells using only a single transcription factor, according to a study published today (Feb. 5) in__ linkurl:Cell.;http://www.cell.com/ __Ever since Kyoto University's linkurl:Shinya Yamanaka;http://www.frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/rc02/kyojuE.html showed in 2006 that the overexpression of just four genes -- c-Myc, Sox2, Oct4, and Klf4 -- could effectively turn adult skin cells into embryonic-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, researchers have been in a race to simplify the recipe. Last year, a team led by Hans Schöler of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine in Münster, Germany, found that just two of the standard four genes -- Oct4 and Klf4 -- were necessary to reprogram mouse adult neural stem cells. Now, Schöler has cut that number in half again by fine-tuning his protocol to only a single factor: Oct4....




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