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Sticking it to science

Every day, in countless classrooms across the globe, chalk-dusted science professors turn to rapidly sketched stick figure drawings to communicate scientific concepts with an economy of style. Now, linkurl:Florida Citizens for Science;http://www.flascience.org/ has celebrated the time-honored teaching method with its linkurl:Stick Science;http://www.flascience.org/sshome.html cartoon contest. Brandon Haught, communications director at the science advocacy group, conceived of the contest and to

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Every day, in countless classrooms across the globe, chalk-dusted science professors turn to rapidly sketched stick figure drawings to communicate scientific concepts with an economy of style. Now, linkurl:Florida Citizens for Science;http://www.flascience.org/ has celebrated the time-honored teaching method with its linkurl:Stick Science;http://www.flascience.org/sshome.html cartoon contest. Brandon Haught, communications director at the science advocacy group, conceived of the contest and told __The Scientist__ that he saw it as a unique way to educate the public about science and award some prizes in the form of donated books and media materials that he'd been accumulating. "I didn't really like the idea of essay contests," Haught said.

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Participants were asked to illustrate misconceptions about science held by the general public. Many of the 37 entries (Haught said he wasn't sure how many were submitted by scientists) dealt with evolution and the misinformation and confusion that...




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