Still no bioterror work at Texas A&M

Research on bioterrorist agents at Texas A&M University is linkurl:still suspended;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53600/ due to breaches in biosafety practices, although the university said last year it expected to be cleared to continue such work by the end of 2007. "The program continues to be on hold," Sherylon Carroll of the university's press office told The Scientist. "We are waiting for feedback from the Centers for Disease Control." The CDC suspended the university's bioterro

Alla Katsnelson
Jan 1, 2008
Research on bioterrorist agents at Texas A&M University is linkurl:still suspended;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53600/ due to breaches in biosafety practices, although the university said last year it expected to be cleared to continue such work by the end of 2007. "The program continues to be on hold," Sherylon Carroll of the university's press office told The Scientist. "We are waiting for feedback from the Centers for Disease Control." The CDC suspended the university's bioterrorism research last year, after it emerged that a lab working with Brucella failed to report a worker's exposure to the pathogen. The finding led to a linkurl:flurry of revelations;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53673/ about biosafety lapses in academic labs around the country. The Dallas Morning News linkurl:reported;http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/texassouthwest/stories/122707dntexa&mbiolabs.2d386e2.html last week that the agency has given Texas A&M no information about when the university might restart the research program. "They have given us absolutely no clue or sign as to when this thing will...

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