"Study ethics, NIH!"

The government agency tasked with funding crucial life science research needs to focus more attention on ethical quandaries and nefarious business practices that often obscure the path from discovery to public benefit, says a strongly worded linkurl:letter;http://www.pharmedout.org/NIHLetter.pdf to linkurl:Francis Collins,;http://www.nih.gov/about/director/index.htm the director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), signed by more than 100 biomedical researchers, journal editors, and healt

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Nov 16, 2009
The government agency tasked with funding crucial life science research needs to focus more attention on ethical quandaries and nefarious business practices that often obscure the path from discovery to public benefit, says a strongly worded linkurl:letter;http://www.pharmedout.org/NIHLetter.pdf to linkurl:Francis Collins,;http://www.nih.gov/about/director/index.htm the director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), signed by more than 100 biomedical researchers, journal editors, and health care administrators in the US. "...we ask that you acknowledge the research gap on the effect of conflicts of interest and commercial influence on medical decision making," the letter reads, "and set in motion a process that leads to recognition of the importance of funding studies on research ethics, the beliefs and behaviors of researchers and clinicians, and the effects of industry-academic relationships on the generation and dissemination of medical knowledge." "It would be great to raise [the NIH's] awareness, and maybe have them actually do an RFA [request for...

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