Supermodels?

What do a yam, a wasp, and a wallaby all have in common? Well, not much, actually, but they're all being touted as the next big experimental model, according to a new laboratory manual due out in April. The second volume of Emerging Model Organisms, from the linkurl:Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press,;http://www.cshlpress.com/ examines a range of organisms -- some familiar, some not -- that could soon be coming to a lab near you. Image:Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press linkurl:Richard Behrin

Lauren Urban
Mar 18, 2010
What do a yam, a wasp, and a wallaby all have in common? Well, not much, actually, but they're all being touted as the next big experimental model, according to a new laboratory manual due out in April. The second volume of Emerging Model Organisms, from the linkurl:Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press,;http://www.cshlpress.com/ examines a range of organisms -- some familiar, some not -- that could soon be coming to a lab near you.

Image:Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
linkurl:Richard Behringer,;http://www3.mdanderson.org/public/genedev/public_html/behringer.html an editorial adviser for the book and developmental geneticist at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, told The Scientist that he hopes the book will help present alternative model organisms that have different strengths than ones currently popular within the scientific community. "Research is dominated by a small number of model organisms," Behringer said, listing the usual suspects (mice, chicks, frogs, etc.) as examples. The book consist of...
The ScientistDrosophilaEmerging Model Organisms



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