Teen's cancer study wins Intel prize

A 17-year-old high school student from North Carolina has won the 2008 linkurl:Intel Science Talent Search;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/index.htm for developing a genetic method that predicts the likelihood of relapse in early-stage colon cancer patients. Intel linkurl:awarded;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/2008winners.htm Shivani Sud a $100,000 college scholarship for her work in labs at Temple University and the National Cancer Institute. Sud has been pursuing her interest in cancer

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

View full profile.


Learn about our editorial policies.

Mar 12, 2008
A 17-year-old high school student from North Carolina has won the 2008 linkurl:Intel Science Talent Search;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/index.htm for developing a genetic method that predicts the likelihood of relapse in early-stage colon cancer patients. Intel linkurl:awarded;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/2008winners.htm Shivani Sud a $100,000 college scholarship for her work in labs at Temple University and the National Cancer Institute. Sud has been pursuing her interest in cancer research since her early teens; when __The Scientist__ linkurl:profiled;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/25137/ her in 2006, she had already worked on projects developing new cancer drug delivery vectors and studying the downregulation of proteins involved with apoptosis. Sud's prize-winning "50-gene model," which uses gene expression to molecularly characterize colon tumor types, improves upon current visual tumor identification methods and could one day be used to tailor drug treatments to individual patients based on the state of their tumors.
m for developing a genetic method that predicts the likelihood of relapse in early-stage colon cancer patients. Intel linkurl:awarded;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/2008winners.htm Shivani Sud a $100,000 college scholarship for her work in labs at Temple University and the National Cancer Institute. Sud has been pursuing her interest in cancer research since her early teens; when __The Scientist__ linkurl:profiled;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/25137/ her in 2006, she had already worked on projects developing new cancer drug delivery vectors and studying the downregulation of proteins involved with apoptosis. Sud's prize-winning "50-gene model," which uses gene expression to molecularly characterize colon tumor types, improves upon current visual tumor identification methods and could one day be used to tailor drug treatments to individual patients based on the state of their tumors.

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?